Q: What Fighter Pilot Used Gum on His Windscreen as a Gunsight?- page 2 | History | Air & Space Magazine
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Only a handful of Nieuport 28s survive (one is in the National Air and Space Museum), but there are many replicas today. Chuck Wentworth flies one built by a former Hollywood stunt pilot. (© Philip Makanna / Ghosts)

Q: What Fighter Pilot Used Gum on His Windscreen as a Gunsight?

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(Continued from page 1)

What bomber was used in every theater of World War II?

The North American B-25 Mitchell. A highly versatile airplane, the B-25 could carry more than 3,000 pounds of ordnance and was an effective attack aircraft.

How many astronauts have walked on the moon?

Twelve.

What airline started as a cropdusting service known as the Huff-Daland Duster Company?

Delta Air Lines. Huff-Daland Duster was founded in Georgia in 1924 as the first commercial agricultural flying company. In 1928, C. Woolman, the founder of Delta, took over the company from financially distressed Huff-Daland and changed its name to Delta Air Service, as its route covered the Mississippi Delta region.

What was the first space mission to have a mission patch?

Gemini 5. The crew wanted to put their stamp on their mission, so they created a patch with a Conestoga wagon to symbolize pioneering spirit and added the slogan “8 days or bust.” NASA covered the slogan with a piece of nylon cloth but left the wagon.

When was a movie first shown on a commercial flight?

On April 6, 1925. A British carrier, Imperial Airways, showed The Lost World, a short adaptation of Arthur Conan Doyle’s novel of the same title. The orchestral music that normally accompanied silent films was piped into the cabin via radio, though with the noisy engines of the era, the music must have been played at exceedingly high volume to compete.

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