Q: What Fighter Pilot Used Gum on His Windscreen as a Gunsight?- page 3 | History | Air & Space Magazine
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Only a handful of Nieuport 28s survive (one is in the National Air and Space Museum), but there are many replicas today. Chuck Wentworth flies one built by a former Hollywood stunt pilot. (© Philip Makanna / Ghosts)

Q: What Fighter Pilot Used Gum on His Windscreen as a Gunsight?

The answer* is in a new Air & Space trivia book, guaranteed to win your bar bets.

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(Continued from page 2)

The title of the movie October Sky is an anagram for what book by NASA engineer Homer Hickam?

Rocket Boys. What started out as a short article about his boyhood for Air & Space/Smithsonian magazine in 1995 was so popular that NASA scientist and engineer Homer Hickam turned it into a memoir called Rocket Boys. The book was made into a heartwarming movie called October Sky in 1999.

What was the first exclusively airborne invasion?

The German invasion of Crete, in May 1941. During World War II, the Luftwaffe experimented with using aircraft to deliver troops into battle by either parachute or glider. The first exclusively airborne invasion was made when the Germans used an initial wave of paratroopers to secure the airfield on the Mediterranean island of Crete, thereby allowing their transport vehicles to deliver heavy equipment and reinforcements.

What kind of airplane attacked King Kong at the top of the Empire State Building in the 1933 movie King Kong?

A Curtiss F8C Helldiver. For the famous shot, the airplanes were filmed taking off and landing at an airfield on Long Island. Background views of New York from the Empire State Building were filmed separately.

What type of sandwich did astronaut John Young smuggle into his spacesuit on Gemini 3?

Corned beef. NASA was not amused.

Who was the first British astronaut?

Helen Sharman. In 1991 Sharman boarded the Soyuz TM-12 space capsule and became the first Briton in space. Sharman was a chemist with Mars Food UK in 1989 when she heard an ad on the radio for astronauts. She was selected from more than 13,000 applicants to be the British member of the Russian scientific space mission Project Juno.

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