Lockheed SR-71A | Panoramas | Air & Space Magazine
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Lockheed SR-71A

A long-range, advanced, strategic reconnaissance aircraft

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The SR-71, unofficially known as the "Blackbird," is a long-range, advanced, strategic reconnaissance aircraft developed from the Lockheed A-12 and YF-12A aircraft. The first flight of an SR-71 took place on Dec. 22, 1964, and the first SR-71 to enter service was delivered to the 4200th (later 9th) Strategic Reconnaissance Wing at Beale Air Force Base, Calif., in January 1966. The U.S. Air Force retired its fleet of SR-71s on Jan. 26, 1990, because of a decreasing defense budget and high costs of operation. 

Throughout its nearly 24-year career, the SR-71 remained the world's fastest and highest-flying operational aircraft. From 80,000 feet, it could survey 100,000 square miles of Earth's surface per hour. On July 28, 1976, an SR-71 set two world records for its class -- an absolute speed record of 2,193.167 mph and an absolute altitude record of 85,068.997 feet. On March 21, 1968, in the aircraft on display at the National Museum of the United States Air Force, Maj. (later Gen.) Jerome F. O'Malley and Maj. Edward D. Payne made the first operational SR-71 sortie. During its career, this aircraft accumulated 2,981 flying hours and flew 942 total sorties (more than any other SR-71), including 257 operational missions, from Beale Air Force Base, Calif., Palmdale, Calif., Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, and RAF (Base), Mildenhall, England. The aircraft was flown to the museum in March 1990.

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About Lyle Jansma

Over time, photographer Lyle Jansma has improved his technique for creating and sharing 360º cockpit views, taking his camera to other aircraft collections including the Museum of Flight, Tillamook Air Museum, Evergreen Air & Space Museum, and the National Museum of the Air Force in Dayton, Ohio. The images are available on the ACI Cockpit360º App for iPads and iPhones, and now, in the Panorama gallery.

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